Ignoring Obvious Changes of Condition

Quail Creek Nursing and Rehabilitation in Oklahoma has been in local news because of more abuse and neglect allegations. Ken Capshaw, husband of resident Ann, said that the home refused to call in a doctor to help his wife, whose face and neck were severely swollen. Capshaw called an ambulance, who rushed Ann to the hospital. One of the nurses told Capshaw that Ann would likely have died in the afternoon if she hadn’t been rushed to the hospital. Capshaw said that his wife will not be going back into the facility.

Wes Bledsoe, a citizen advocate, said the state needs to stop ignoring complaints. Dorya Huser, Chief of Long Term Care for the State Department of Health, said that state inspectors do all they can. They conduct interviews, maintain records, and review past records in an effort to improve the situation. Huser said that they have cited the facility. Bledsoe doesn’t think that a citation is enough. Bledsoe is calling for a more thorough investigation of the incident and the facility.

With multiple allegations, complaints, and a citation, the question arises of how far is too far? How many instances of abuse and neglect are necessary before the state does more than simply issue a citation? Bledsoe claims that the state conducts their investigations with blinders on. If it’s not happening in front of them, he says, then it’s like it doesn’t exist.
 

Trackbacks (0) Links to blogs that reference this article Trackback URL
http://www.scnursinghomelaw.com/admin/trackback/296291
Comments (0) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Post A Comment / Question Use this form to add a comment to this entry.







Remember personal info?
Send To A Friend Use this form to send this entry to a friend via email.