The Miami Herald also had an article on the new tort reform measures in Florida.  "Despite the emotional testimony from the families of nursing home patients who suffered abuses, the bill cleared its last stop on Monday — with a 12-3 vote by the Senate Rules Committee — and is headed to the Senate floor."
Ken Thurston and his sister, Sandra Banning, who have been speaking out against this legislation, told committee members their mother, Virginia, was raped in 2002 at a Jacksonville nursing home by another resident with a history of sexual assaults. The siblings never collected a $750,000 verdict from the owner of the Glenwood Nursing Center (then called Southwood), which was later shut down.  Thurston asked the panel: “Who benefits from this legislation? To put it another way, whose rights are being subordinated and whose are being protected by this bill?”

AARP Florida advocacy manager Jack McRay calls the bill “unnecessary and unconscionable.”
“It’s already exceedingly difficult to get punitive damages in a case,” he said.. Making it even harder to sue for punitive damages “eliminates the deterrent factor for future behavior.”
Since 2001, the state has required that half the funds from punitive damage cases against nursing homes be placed in a trust fund — and that has yet to happen, according to the Agency for Health Care Administration.